reporting on board

Say hello to other friends of the Royal Navy Airship Service!

reporting on board

Postby gunner » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:30 am

permission to come aboard, (salutes quarterdeck)
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Re: reporting on board

Postby Kona » Thu Feb 04, 2010 4:05 pm

Permission granted, Gunner! I assume you have some experience with field or naval artillery. Get settled in, draw a cup of messdeck joe and we'll swap war stories.
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Re: reporting on board

Postby gunner » Fri Feb 05, 2010 6:56 am

nothing that heavy, i'm a former u.s. marine lance corporal machinegunner on the old .30 caliber m1919a4 browning many years ago. i've also got a fair store of knowledge of military small arms, u.s., british and european, of the late 19th and 20th centuries. i'll note by the way your art showing the german kar98k rifle was accurate, more so than most cartoon illustrations.
"gunner"
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Re: reporting on board

Postby Kona » Fri Feb 05, 2010 7:01 pm

Ah. First of all, I want to clarify that I am not the artist/site owner; that would be Paul Gazis. I’m just an avid fan responding to new arrivals as they come into the forum. I’m sure he notes your comments and appreciates them.

Good to have you aboard, Gunner. I served as a gunner’s mate in a twin 5” gun mount on a WW2 era “Gearing” class destroyer in the Vietnam era. I also was mount captain in a 5” turret on the “Oklahoma City”, then flagship of the 7th fleet. My GQ crew consisted of our Marine detachment, and I was very impressed with their discipline and professionalism. We respected each other and got along well.

I was very familiar with both the 30 and 50 cal. machine guns, since we had them mounted on the bridge wings and used them extensively against small surface targets.
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Re: reporting on board

Postby gunner » Fri Feb 05, 2010 7:44 pm

kona,
glad to be on board mate, those old 5 inch 38s were good guns. i was pretty much a mud marine back in '55/59. never got sea duty. one of my neighbors, a motorcycle riding buddy, was a loader on a 40mm mount aboard u.s.s. enterprise in ww2, he passed on a few years ago and i broke out my old dress blues for the funeral, standing hand salute for the legion firing party and taps. we're losing the ww2 vets daily and while when someone famous dies it gets noted in the news someone should be there to do the honours for the familes of the ordinary blokes who served the guns and kept the engines running.
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Re: reporting on board

Postby gunner » Fri Feb 05, 2010 7:58 pm

by the way, i noticed your join date, we're pretty much plank owners ain't we?
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Re: reporting on board

Postby Kona » Fri Feb 05, 2010 10:55 pm

gunner wrote:by the way, i noticed your join date, we're pretty much plank owners ain't we?


That we are, sir! :D (Paul, take note: First crew of the new vessel!)

My dad served in France under General Eisenhower, and for a year or so of the occupation. He passed away at 87 in ’97. They made em tough in those days. I’d have to let my dress blues out some to get into them now, but they fell to pieces years ago anyway. I made it to one ship’s reunion about 5 years ago, and couldn’t believe how OLD everybody had gotten! Still got my ship’s cruise books, my photos and my memories, for as long as I last.
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Re: reporting on board

Postby PaulGazis » Sat Feb 06, 2010 8:30 am

gunner wrote:nothing that heavy, i'm a former u.s. marine lance corporal machinegunner on the old .30 caliber m1919a4 browning many years ago. i've also got a fair store of knowledge of military small arms, u.s., british and european, of the late 19th and 20th centuries. i'll note by the way your art showing the german kar98k rifle was accurate, more so than most cartoon illustrations.
"gunner"


Thanks, gunner! I was wondering if anyone would notice. I put a fair bit of effort into that particular graphic. The front sight was a bit off, some of the proportions could have been better, and one can only cram so much detail in a 300x500 pixel image, but it was fun trying to see what I could manage and waiting to see if anyone would spot it :)

Someday I hope to redraw the QF2 Pom Pom gun in Episode 43 to see if I can do a better job. And if I ever redraw the Infamous Green Marine, I'd like to give him a real Enfield rather than that generic scribble. To which end, I may want to draw on your expertise regarding the history of British infantry weapons in the inter-War period.

And oh yes... do you know anything about Russian automatic pistols in the 1920s?
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Re: reporting on board

Postby gunner » Sat Feb 06, 2010 11:00 am

russian semi-auto pistols in the 1920s... basically in that period which saw the "red vs. white" russian war/counter revolution most russian trooops/officers used the model 1891 7.62mm nagant revolver, with some older czarist purchased smith and wesson top break .44 revolvers and some c96 mauser semi-auto pistols, the "broomhandle" mauser. a russian semi-auto pistol did not come into use until the advent of the TT30, (tula-tokarev) and later TT33 7.62mm pistol, a very much simplified browning type, but the nagant revolver continued in service to the end of world war 2, "the great patriotic war" as the russians commonly refer to it. the TT33 pistol stayed in issue until it was replaced during the '50s by the 9mm makarov firing a 9x18mm cartridge not interchangeable with 9x19 luger/parabellum or 9x17mm browning (.380acp) the russian military/police handgun market is in a state of flux lately, with several designs, including 9x19 caliber competing to replace the makarov. going back to the czarist era, an unknown number of colt model 1911 .45 pistols marked "english payment" were said to have been sold to russia, but none have ever surfaced as war souvenirs or on the international collectors market. i'll go on to the british small arms a bit later, after i've gotten some sleep. i've just pulled an all nighter reading and posting to a gun rights forum in india. they're starting a movement to gain some of the rights we enjoy here in the u.s. and they've got a long row to hoe.
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Re: reporting on board

Postby PaulGazis » Sun Feb 07, 2010 1:51 am

gunner wrote:...a russian semi-auto pistol did not come into use until the advent of the TT30, (tula-tokarev) and later TT33 7.62mm pistol, a very much simplified browning type...


Thanks again, gunner! That's exactly what I needed to know. I'd found some vague references on the Web, but for things like this, I'd much rather get information from an authority on the subject. Events in the world of the Flying Cloud may have begun to diverge from our own world of the 1920s in some respects, but they're still close enough that things like this can be important. As we shall see :)

The Infamous Green Marine of Episode 13 has finally been redrawn, complete with a teeny tiny 120x21 pixel Enfield. At least, it began life as an Enfield. It may have mutated during the colorizing and reduction stage. Alas. We may strive for technical accuracy, but we do not always succeed as well as we hoped...
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