I come with engines...

Say hello to other friends of the Royal Navy Airship Service!

I come with engines...

Postby quiet » Fri Jun 04, 2010 11:31 pm

I found a link leading me here some months ago, started reading and was fascinated. So now I'm waiting every week for the story to go on.

[salutes] requesting permission to board.
I hope there's some free space left in one of those engine cars...

I'm currently studying to become an engineer, working at a camshaft manufacturer when there is time left. And, sometimes, fixing cars...

I blame my father for infecting me with the virus of aviation, so I'm attracted by anything that gets of the ground. Most times, those things have wings. On some occasions, though, he showed me pictures of the old Zeppelins, planting another seed in my mind. I don't know much about british designs (yet), as they tend to be rather unknown here in germany. That's one of those things the internet has made a lot easier.

I do hope that my english will get better as I get to use it more often. It's a shame to see what I've lost since school ended...

Christoph
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Re: I come with engines...

Postby PaulGazis » Sat Jun 05, 2010 3:20 pm

Welcome aboard, Christoph! I'm glad you're enjoying the story! There's plenty of room in those engine cars -- though they may get rather loud when the diesels are running at full power -- and we most definitely need more experienced engineers to make sure we get our technical details correct!

I'm not surprised that the British airship designs aren't too well known in Germany. In our world, the British program got off to a reasonable start with the HMA-1, HMA-9, and HMA-23 -- the later appears in the Flying Cloud FAQ pages as 'Number 23' -- and their R-33 and R-34 were quite successful. But the British lost momentum after the War as their economy languished. Development slowed, construction dates were pushed back, projects were canceled, and after the crash of the R-101 in 1930, the British program came to an end.

In our world, the Germans had the best airship program. They built more ships, they understood the importance of training and experience, and they had more consistent designs -- indeed, Britain's R-33 and R-34 were copies of the German L-33. But in Captain Everett's world, where more money and resources are available, the British program is comparable to the German one, and other nations are catching up. Though Norway's attempt to arm an airship with flamethrowers in an effort to create a 'dragonship' did not work out quite as well as they hoped :)
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Re: I come with engines...

Postby Kona » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:27 am

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I'll add my welcome aboard, Quiet.

Your English is excellent for a non-native speaker. Would that more English speakers could master other languages, but we are quite spoiled in that regard. Our loss! Words are the tools with which we think. The greater our vocabulary, in as many languages as possible, the more nuanced and powerful our ability to think about all things.

Also, the better to appreciate the subtle, dry humor of FC . . .

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The tide is out; please leave a message.
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Re: I come with engines...

Postby quiet » Mon Jun 07, 2010 1:47 am

[bows] Nice to meet you all.

PaulGazis wrote:There's plenty of room in those engine cars -- though they may get rather loud when the diesels are running at full power -- and we most definitely need more experienced engineers to make sure we get our technical details correct!

The enginges of that time most propably were really loud even at idle, so I'll try to find another place to sleep :D
Getting believeable details shouldn't be a problem, as the Diesels of that time were the grandfathers of what was built until around 1990. When the Hindenburg was built, its engines were far from being a new design, and Mercedes has continued building them without major changes until around 1980... I know someone at Mercedes-Benz who has worked with them, and as most Diesels of that time were largely built alike, there shouldn't be a problem to "transfer" some details.
The fuel injection used at that time is an interesting thing itself, the great-grandfather of what was used until even after 2000 (with some electronics added when airships were but a memory). Adjusting a 16-cylinder-unit must have been a hell of its own, though.

PaulGazis wrote:I'm not surprised that the British airship designs aren't too well known in Germany. In our world, the British program got off to a reasonable start with the HMA-1, HMA-9, and HMA-23 -- the later appears in the Flying Cloud FAQ pages as 'Number 23' -- and their R-33 and R-34 were quite successful. But the British lost momentum after the War as their economy languished. Development slowed, construction dates were pushed back, projects were canceled, and after the crash of the R-101 in 1930, the British program came to an end.

Reading german books you could get the impression that the R100 and R101 were the only British ariships ever built, and that they were rather far behind the Zeppelins of their time. On the other hand, most books about the Zeppelins aren't really much better either.

In our world, the Zeppelin works were saved by the US contract to build the Los Angeles - Those really known Zeppelings afterwards couldn't have been built without that, as the Zeppelin works were to be shut down to disarm the country. So, it's save to say that in Captain Everett's world and timeline they would have developed differently, too. They wouldn't have had the expierience of those late into the war models, but they wouldn't have been strangled by a ruined economy. I think there would be a fleet of military Zeppelins, but also a rather large civil fleet operating wherever there's money to make. We wouldn't see the legendary "Graf Zeppelin", though - it was built that way only because there was no way the Zeppelin works could have afforded to build a larger shed at that time.

PaulGazis wrote:Though Norway's attempt to arm an airship with flamethrowers in an effort to create a 'dragonship' did not work out quite as well as they hoped :)

Still I'm sure it was one look to remember :shock:

Kona wrote:Your English is excellent for a non-native speaker

Thanks alot, it's good to know I'm not completely horrible to read. Still, I need to much time and too much thougt to simply remember the vocabulary - I once could write English texts without really thinking about it, "playing" with the language along the way. It's an art to write, but that won't work as long as I need an hour to write a small posting as this one. Some five or six years only reading (and sometimes listening) have taken their toll on my active vocabulary...

Christoph
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