A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

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A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

Postby felixS » Wed Feb 22, 2012 12:31 pm

Hi all

The 1910 delivered McKeen Railcar of Virginia & Truckee, has been restored in Nevada, what an outstanding Design.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=379551&nseq=0

What do you think?

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Re: A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

Postby Kona » Wed Feb 22, 2012 1:39 pm

Oh my...

Just...Oh my...

I think I just squee'd a little.
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Re: A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

Postby PaulGazis » Thu Feb 23, 2012 6:16 am

Wow! If there's any way I can ever work something like that into the story, I must! :)
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Re: A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

Postby Kona » Thu Feb 23, 2012 6:15 pm

I followed a few links to find out more about this "railcar", and although I now know a lot of its history and passenger compartment, the wannabe engineer in me would like to know more about the powerplant. The only thing I could find is that it's "gas powered". It wouldn't need as much as a true locomotive, but I assume it would have to be sizable enough to pull itself and a couple of cars at a reasonable speed. Knowing engines weren't very efficient by modern standards, it would have to be at least a straight-eight gasoline or diesel, probably taking in about 1,000 cubic inches of combustion chamber. That's a lot of engine in what appears to be a fairly small mechanical area.
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Re: A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

Postby Mutabilis » Sun Feb 26, 2012 1:57 pm

Not that big i would imagine, at 100 HP, or even 300 HP.


http://www.shiawasseehistory.com/mckeen.html
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Re: A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

Postby Kona » Sun Feb 26, 2012 9:03 pm

Mutabilis wrote:Not that big i would imagine, at 100 HP, or even 300 HP.


Ah, right you are! Thanks for the link; very informative. I never knew such vehicles existed, although the rationale for them seems solid. I suppose they had to be lightly built to be self-powered, and they didn't have the technology to make them as durable as the regular railroad cars of the time.
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Re: A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

Postby Mutabilis » Mon Feb 27, 2012 4:05 pm

Selfpropelled railcars go back to the middle of the 19th century. Mostly they were used for regional lines, where shorter intervals between trains were more important than size and speed. There were also a few express trains, among them the "flying hamburger" which set a speed record that held for over a decade.

The problem with the example here seems to be that their engines were notoriously unreliable. I don't know if that was because they were compact designs that were strained by the workload they had to deliver, or if they were faulty to begin with.
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Re: A real world "Dieselpunk Railcar"

Postby Beewine » Sat Feb 07, 2015 11:45 pm

ok a few years later...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_a ... tor_Car_22

Blatent snipping from Wikipedia

Motor Car 22 was powered by a 200-horsepower (150 kW), gasoline internal combustion engine that was modeled after a marine engine. The engine was connected to the motor car's 42 inches (1,067 mm) driving wheels via a Morse "silent" chain drive. After the restoration of Motor Car 22, the engine was replaced with a modern Caterpillar diesel engine because no original McKeen engine was available. The original chain drive was also replaced with a hydraulic drive.

Maximum speed 32 1⁄2 mph (52.3 km/h)

The car body was constructed from steel using a monocoque design and given an aerodynamic shape. The body consisted of a curved roof, rounded rear end, and its distinctive knife-edge "wind-splitter" front end. Also a characteristic of the McKeen railcars was the frequent use of porthole windows; a total of 33 were used on Motor Car 22. The interior of Motor Car 22 was divided into the engine compartment inside the pointed front end of the motor car, the passenger compartment at the rear of the car, and the baggage compartment in the middle. When built, it had a seating capacity of 84 passengers.

The profitability of the line led the Virginia and Truckee to start additional passenger service using self-propelled motor cars, which were less expensive to operate than a train pulled by a steam locomotive.


(Maybe you could run into these these somewhere where there was a need for light rail transport. )
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