Critical systems

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Critical systems

Postby dennislee » Mon Sep 27, 2010 5:00 pm

Hello , And thanks for the strip.
Paul, I am in the same boat as you with Win7. I have had ' 7 for 1/2 year and am still using an old laptop for my graphics processing. Every time MS makes things easier for me it takes a year to get it fixed. After decades of successful file management I can't seem to get my files where I want them.
I hope R505 has a slipstick for navigation.
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Re: Critical systems

Postby PaulGazis » Tue Sep 28, 2010 4:50 am

The Dark Lord of Redmund strikes again!

Graphics for Elf-Lords, under sky
Compilers for Dwarves in their halls of stone
Spreadsheets for Mortals, doomed to die
Windows for the Dark Lord, on his dark throne

Windows to rule them all
Windows to find them
Windows to bring them all
and in darkness to bind them

In the land of Redmund, where the shadows lie...


With apologies to J.R.R. Tolkein :)
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Re: Critical systems

Postby peterh » Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:52 pm

I don't get it. As in, I am now truly pissed-off.

Never mind that folks are unable to spell Redmond, or even Tolkien. That's just me waving a Useless Broom Made Entirely Out Of Dicks. :mrgreen:
It´s just that, if [something] does not work on their particular Windows 7 installation, whereas this [something] worked perfectly well under their particular Windows XP installation, it is automagically assumed to be Microsoft's fault.

Before we proceed, I want to make it absolutely, positively, clear that I do not work for, or own shares of, or are in any way affiliated with or dependent upon, any Redmond-based software company, period.

I won't say the ONLY thing that I could get running on Windows 7 was my graphics software. In fact, there was nothing I was previously running on Windows XP that I could NOT get running on Windows 7, including the software I write myself.

But Photoshop, NeatImage, Paint Shop Pro and all of my scanning/OCR software (the latter of which I wrote myself) ran on first request.

Being a software engineer, I *know* a thing or two about how sloppy code on the part of the application programmer can break an application under Windows Vista or Windows 7. I also know how, in the perception of a clueless user, the blame for this lies with The Dark Lord Of Redmond.

Wherein A Soapbox Is Erected
I think that Windows 7 is a bl00dy brilliant piece of work, period. If your software works under Windows XP, but doesn't work under Windows 7, it's highly likely due to sloppy programming, using methods that were documented to be obsolete under Windows XP (or Windows 2000, or Windows NT, or even Windows 3.x...) in the first place. Such as saving your .INI file to "C:\\Windows\\WeAreClueless.INI" (even though you may not even have a C:\drive, or a \Windows folder on C:\), rather than to %systemdir% + "\\WeAreClueless.INI", which would've been a marginally better idea. Only marginally - it would still go against commonsense - but at least in a more or less default Windows 7 installation, it might have worked.
Trust me, don't get me started. I've seen code in commercially sold applications that is *that* bad. If that code still worked for you in Windows XP, you were lucky. If it stops working on Windows 7, don't blame Bill.

In general, don't blame Bill anyway - he doesn't work at Microsoft, and hasn't been for a few years, but that's another story.

Lighten up, folks. It's not just in the software industry that cause and effect are often confused.

cheers,
Peter (I've had it up to *^here* with clueless Microsoft bashers, and I am not even affiliated with Microsoft, but I am also not afraid or even ashamed of posting this with my full name under it) Huppertz.
Don't panic... we're on the Titanic.
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Re: Critical systems

Postby PaulGazis » Wed Sep 29, 2010 4:08 am

From the standpoint of a scientific developer, who's been involved with some substantial multi-platform projects, I'd have to say that all OS's have problems. Linux is a ruddy pain. MacOS hides everything you need. Windows, until recently, was a superb source of memory leaks for later export to poor Third World countries that could not afford memory leaks of their own. They seem to have fixed this with Windows 7, but I am not thrilled by the way they handled UAC, and I'm not entirely certain how it improves the user experience to make us click three separate message boxes each and every time we want to overwrite a file. So I apologize to partisans of any particular operating system, and I've taken pains to change to mouseover in the sidebar to a more universal sentiment! I leave you all with the following observation:

Have you ever noticed that the Song of Ringlore can be sung to the tune of 'Do Re Mi' from the Sound of Music?

Nine for Mortals doomed to die!
Seven for Dwarf-Lords under stone!
Three for Elf-Lord under sky!
One for Dark Lord on his throne!

One, riiiing to rule them all!
One, riiiing to find them!
One, riiing to bring them all!
And in the Darkness... bind them!


Dreadful, isn't it? Your lives will never be the same :)

Warning: do not even THINK of ways one could work in tunes from the Wizard of Oz...
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Re: Critical systems

Postby Kona » Wed Sep 29, 2010 3:01 pm

Why do I suddenly have the urge to smoke a doobie and listen to "Dark Side of the Moon"?
The tide is out; please leave a message.
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Re: Critical systems

Postby peterh » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:03 pm

PaulGazis wrote:From the standpoint of a scientific developer, who's been involved with some substantial multi-platform projects, I'd have to say that all OS's have problems. Linux is a ruddy pain. MacOS hides everything you need. Windows, until recently, was a superb source of memory leaks for later export to poor Third World countries that could not afford memory leaks of their own. They seem to have fixed this with Windows 7, but I am not thrilled by the way they handled UAC, and I'm not entirely certain how it improves the user experience to make us click three separate message boxes each and every time we want to overwrite a file.


From the standpoint of a commercial developer, who's been involved with some multi-platform projects, I concur with your very first statement.
However, an operating system is no more the source of memory leaks than the applications and services that run on it - and most memory leaks usually associated with Windows were in fact caused by sloppy service programmers who decided that it was a waste of time to dispose objects before recreating new instances of same objects, or rather, only disposing the objects at the end of a routine, thus leaving the objects in memory in case a routine terminated in a nonstandard fashion.

This issue has been addressed - not by Windows 7, but rather by the .NET Framework, which does a very good job at garbage collection, thus allowing for coding that would've been considered sloppy when C++ was king (objects only live within the context of the code block they're instantiated in, the .NET garbage collector occasionally comes along to collect whatever's been left by nonexistent code blocks, and you have to jump through a hoop -- on fire -- to do structured exception handling).

Oh, and UAC can be told to keep its mouth shut. I prefer it to be on by default on my neighbour's computer, because of the threats it attempts to address (and it does a fairly nice job at addressing it). But I've turned it off on my own machine.

I also think that if you have to click THREE dialog boxes to overwrite a file, methinks your application is being a bit paranoid. The standard .NET SaveFileDialog only gives you one, and the FileSystem COM object behaved in the same way.
Don't panic... we're on the Titanic.
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Re: Critical systems

Postby peterh » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:05 pm

Kona wrote:Why do I suddenly have the urge to smoke a doobie and listen to "Dark Side of the Moon"?


I am so hoping that this is a rethorical question. :mrgreen:
Don't panic... we're on the Titanic.
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Re: Critical systems

Postby Kona » Thu Sep 30, 2010 8:43 pm

peterh wrote:
Kona wrote:Why do I suddenly have the urge to smoke a doobie and listen to "Dark Side of the Moon"?


I am so hoping that this is a rethorical question. :mrgreen:

I'd say uhhh,,, wut??? but my irony gland has been drying up since the 60's and I can't do it with a straight face any more.
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Re: Critical systems

Postby peterh » Thu Sep 30, 2010 8:49 pm

... lol. LOL! ROFLPMP!!!
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